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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 410
Loss before visiting the physician and loss before getting the drug at the pharmacist unit: An observation from a primary care center


1 TWS Primary Care Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Hainan Medical University, Haikou, Hainan, China

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Date of Web Publication14-Nov-2016
 

How to cite this article:
Sukkaromdee P, Wiwanitkit V. Loss before visiting the physician and loss before getting the drug at the pharmacist unit: An observation from a primary care center. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2016;9:410

How to cite this URL:
Sukkaromdee P, Wiwanitkit V. Loss before visiting the physician and loss before getting the drug at the pharmacist unit: An observation from a primary care center. Ann Trop Med Public Health [serial online] 2016 [cited 2017 Mar 26];9:410. Available from: http://www.atmph.org/text.asp?2016/9/6/410/193945
Dear Sir,

It is no doubt that the patient has to have good compliance to physician's instruction and get complete course of prescribed drug. In many situations, there are problems of poor compliance that result in poor clinical outcome. Sometimes, this results in morbidity and mortality. However, the patient might be lost before getting the drug. Here, the authors report their experience from a primary care center in a developing Asian country. During a 1-month period in October 2015, there were 1,486 visits to the primary care center. The authors retrospectively studied on the rate of loss before visiting the physician and before getting the drug at the pharmacist unit (our center used computerized paperless online physician's prescription system). According to this study, there were 40 losses (2.72%) before visiting the physician. This meant, 2.72% of the patients went to the medical center without visiting to get physical examination, instruction, or drugs. Focusing on the 1,446 visits left, the physicians in charge prescribed drugs for 1,182 visits. Of those 1,182 cases, there were 28 (2.37%; 1.91% of overall 1,486 visits) losses before getting the drug at the pharmacist unit. It seems that a similar high percentage of loss before getting the drug at the pharmacist unit to loss before visiting the physician can be seen. The nurses in charge tried calling to the lost cases and they got replies from only 12 cases (0.81%). All the cases who replied the nurses in charge mentioned that they had no time to wait. Indeed, the mentioned problems are simple and can be seen in any medical centers but it needs attention. To manage the turnaround time might be the solution for some cases. The turnaround time becomes a key factor to serve the patient satisfaction and quality of service.[1],[2] As noted by Neville et al. “regular evaluation of medication turnaround times is recommended to compare with benchmarks, to ensure that hospital standards are being met, and to measure the effects of policy changes and implementation of new technology on medication-use processes.”[3] Nevertheless, there are other issues to consider for managing the situation as well. To have a system to prevent the loss of patients is the big question for further studies.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Kaszuba A, Gibson G. Hospital emergency department surveillance system: A data base for patient care, management, research and teaching. JACEP 1977;6:304-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Crocker B, Lewandrowski EL, Lewandrowski N, Gregory K, Lewandrowski K. Patient satisfaction with point-of-care laboratory testing: Report of a quality improvement program in an ambulatory practice of an academic medical center. Clin Chim Acta 2013;424:8-11.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Neville H, Nodwell L, Alsharif S. Decreasing medication turnaround time with digital scanning technology in a Canadian health region. Can J Hosp Pharm 2014;67:410-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

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Correspondence Address:
Pathoom Sukkaromdee
TWS Primary Care Center, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1755-6783.193945

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